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2016

IveBeenThinkingBlog-1024x459.jpgIn the last two days, several of my clients have experienced the havoc created with miscommunication or just the lack of crystal clear communication. And, this is to say nothing about the fact that 80%+ of potential clients talk about symptoms of this same issue. Why is it so hard?

 

As a former VP of Operations and Supply Chain, I can attest to the fact that consistent, clear communication is actually much harder than it sounds like it should be! It boils down to a few simple facts: 1) Things change (and we all have our own perceptions). 2) The game of telephone — perhaps I'm getting older but we used to play the game of telephone at my childhood parties. You'd tell the person on your right something, and then they'd tell the next person and so on. By the time the message got to the last person, it was garbled. How often does that happen at our jobs? ALL THE TIME!

 

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One tip to implement this week:

 

So, what can we do this week to improve upon the clarity of our communication? Quite a lot. Start by not assuming what we've said is clear to the recipient. I cannot tell you how many times a client has complained about a topic, and after digging further and asking questions, everyone was on a different page, even though each person thought he/she communicated the next step. 

 

So, how can we be clearer? Ask for the other party to confirm what you've said. Or summarize what you think you've agreed upon in different words. Often one of these two approaches will resolve any miscommunication. You could also summarize the plan in an email; however, it is much better to follow one of the first two options and re-confirm with the email. Don't make the email lengthy. A few bullet points to confirm key actions/agreements will suffice.

 

Looking for more ideas to keep your supply chain connected? Access more tips and resources on my blog. And keep connected by subscribing to my newsletter and email feed of “I’ve Been Thinking…”

profit-people-newsletter.jpgClaremont, Calif., August 30, 2016 LMA Consulting Group’s Lisa Anderson, a sought after manufacturing, distribution and supply chain consultant, speaker and writer who works with manufacturers and distributors in aerospace, building products and food to make and keep bold customer promises by empowering people with profit-driven strategies has completed major publishing milestones by reaching the 125th issue of her Profit through PeopleSM Newsletter and 100th edition of “I’ve Been Thinking” weekly tips publication. Complimentary to subscribers, both publications offer insights, ideas and expertise on trends including ERP, SIOP, The Amazon Effect and The Skills Gap.

 

I enjoy sharing these strategies to improve business performance – whether it is helping to grow the business, improve service levels, increase profits or accelerate cash flow, so long as my readers pick up on an idea or two that will deliver bottom line business results, I’m pleased,” explains LMA Consulting President Lisa Anderson. “I hope that by providing this information, manufacturers and distributors have the opportunity to stay ahead of the curve. I conduct leading edge research and am continually looking for “what works” so that our industry can thrive. It is far easier to engage employees when business is growing with exciting opportunities around every corner.IveBeenThinkingBlog-1024x459.jpg

 

Celebrating its eleventh year, LMA Consulting Group helps growing companies elevate overall business performance while creating a customer service edge. Through a number of proven proprietary processes, LMA Consulting Group can pinpoint areas for improvement with eagle eye precision and develop the strategies to deliver results. Anderson, who was named to the top 100 best global supply chain management blogs by SupplyChainOpz, and also recognized as the 16th most influential in supply chain management and sustainability by technology leader SAP in the “Top 46 Resource and Optimizations Influencers (Plus a Few Others),” started LMA Consulting Group is a regular content contributor in topics including supply chain, ERP and SIOP. Anderson has been interviewed for articles in publications like Industry Week, tED Magazine and the Wall Street Journal. She actively posts educational blogs three times weekly and has two newsletters, Profit through PeopleSM and “I’ve Been Thinking.” For information about Lisa Anderson, go to http://www.lma-consultinggroup.com/ or call 909.630.3943.

Fotolia_118637824_XS.jpg80% of leaders are not living up to the task! We come across hundreds of leaders every year – at our clients, non-profit work and while connecting with former colleagues and key contacts. It is unimaginable how many weak leaders there are out there! If you have some of the stronger ones, HANG ON tight!

 

The amount of wishy-washy leaders is simply mind-boggling. How can we get a grasp on this BIG problem rapidly? Start by taking a step back and think about “they”. When you catch yourself saying, “They won’t let me” or “They want xyz”, think about they. Who are they? Put a name to “they”.

 

If you are a manager, perhaps it is your boss, a Director, the CEO or CFO. Do you know? When I became “they”, it was amazing how often I had to catch myself thinking “they”, correcting it to “me or us” — even if it was the executive team, I was responsible to collaborate with this group so it was still up to me to resolve. Or, is there really no “they”? It becomes just something we say. What if we have to start owning “they”?

 

If you are an employee, who is “they”? Insist upon a name or group of names. The roadblocks are suddenly less complicated if we can identify the roadblock (the “they”). If you are the CEO, perhaps you are “they” – unless you are thinking of the Board of Directors or corporate (if you are a General Manager). As in my example, it really circles back to you to address the “they”.

 

Once you know specifically who “they” is, repeat your statement again. Do you really think “they” will not allow you to proceed with what you think is best for the company, your customer, etc.? If so, go talk to your manager.  Perhaps you and your manager can go to “they” together.

 

In our experience, “they” disappear quite quickly. Results will follow. And, leaders will begin to soar.

 

Did you like this article? Continue reading on how to Profit Through People:

Collaboration Platform: Valuing Team Input

It Begins and Ends with Leadership

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Last week, I met with my marketing team on several topics. One of the key areas, stemming from the strategy session with my international advisory board in Sydney is "what is my unique differentiation and value proposition". I have always been passionate about providing exceptional service which ONLY can occur if you have empowered and engaged employees. Thus, we decided upon "I work with manufacturers and distributors (with deep expertise in aerospace, building products and food industries) to make and KEEP bold customer promises by empowering people with profit-driven strategies. From my point-of-view, the promises and profit have to go hand in hand.

 

As we developed this statement, my marketing guru asked me about my bold customer promise. I thought that was a great question (and I had never thought about it for me) yet it was easy to answer — my clients will get results.  

 

So, what does this have to do with pancakes?!? The weekend prior I went on a food tour of La Jolla — quite amazing! We went to Richard Walker's Pancake House on the tour, and returned the next day for a pancake spread. Richard Walker is known for gourmet pancakes, and they refuse to expand beyond the capabilities in San Diego and IL (their flagship store is in Schaumburg, IL, which coincidentally is where I grew up!) because they want to maintain their bold customer promise of high quality gourmet pancakes and breakfasts. Although I am definitely a wheat pancake with nuts, chocolate chips and bananas person, we tried several and this German pancake is simply amazing (see below).

 

 

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One tip to implement this week:

 

So, what is your bold customer promise? We ALL have customers, whether our customers are other departments within our company, our boss or traditional customers for product and services.

 

For this week, don't get too worked up trying to think about your bold customer promise. Start by thinking about your view of your customers. Do you know what they want? A fantastic-sounding bold customer promise does nothing for them if they don't care about it! If you get to know what your customers want and need to be successful, it will go a long way.

 

For example, my customers typically want growth, improved customer service levels, increased profit, quicker cash cycles and engaged employees. However, each customer is different. Making these assumptions will be useless if I meet a customer who just wants to improve repute.


Looking for more ideas to keep your supply chain connected? Access more tips and resources on my blog. And keep connected by subscribing to my newsletter and email feed of “I’ve Been Thinking…”

Kash Gokli.jpgWe are thrilled to announce that Kash Gokli, professor of manufacturing and engineering management, and the Director of Engineering Clinic in the Harvey Mudd College Department of Engineering, has been recognized with the 2016 LMA Advocate Award!

We would not be successful if it wasn't for the support and expertise of our LMA Advocates. These folks have gone over and beyond and contributed significantly to LMA Consulting's success — and, more importantly the significant positive impact we've been able to make with our clients.

Kash and I have partnered together over the last few years to create and host the Harvey Mudd Executive Roundtables. Together, we have created a valuable community of top notch CEOs and senior leaders that meet to learn, discuss and debate timely topics for business success. Kash also gives freely of his time supporting our APICS-IE supply chain, manufacturing and distribution association chapter with presentations and serving as a valuable resource for members. Kash and I also have the opportunity to collaborate on client success since part of his focus at Harvey Mudd is to partner with students and manufacturers to help develop new products and design machinery and process improvements. 

 

Did you like this article? Continue reading on how to Profit Through People and join me in my appreciation of the people who have helped LMA Consulting Group to continue to grow.

 

Thanks to my LMA Advocate Awardees

 

In reviewing project successes and failures,Fotolia_112655568_XS.jpg it turns out that project success has little to do with the technical aspect of projects. Instead, it is all about the people.

Within the last year, we’ve been called by clients struggling with issues ranging from poor delivery performance to sagging margins, while other clients want to ensure they are prepared for strong revenue growth. Every one of these clients required some sort of project to deliver the intended results – growth, profits, margins, cash flow, and efficiencies. Company sizes ranged from $7 million to $50 million to $250 million dollar facilities of multi-billion dollar companies. Industries ranged from building products to aerospace to food. Project scopes ranged from SIOP (sales, inventory, and operations planning) to a dramatic improvement in customer service levels to ERP selection to support the company strategy. Yet despite these differences, every project boiled down to people.

It is commonplace to think that project success has everything to do with whether the technical elements “add up” or whether best practice processes are utilized. Although these can be important, they are not the key driver to project success. Instead, it boils down to people.

Recently, we went into a new client to evaluate a group that was perceived to be struggling so that we could straighten out the challenges. Although there is always something to improve, this group alone was not the root cause of the challenges. There definitely were some technical challenges to resolve; however, the 80/20 related to connections and perceptions – in essence, the people element.

In another client, we have been working on an ERP project with multiple parties. It certainly hit some bumps in the road along the way. Some are typical bottlenecks with these sorts of projects, and some were atypical. What is sure is that 100% of the challenges resulted from the people equation, even though it was a technical project. Miscommunication and the lack of communication abound. Thus, our role became one of connector among several diverse roles and people. Again, the people aspect drove the “80/20” of success.

So, what are a few strategies to keep your project in the “green” when it comes to people?

  • Project leader: Since success begins and ends with leadership, start here. Project leadership is always harder than is originally thought and can be a thankless job. Be upfront and stay in front of this danger!
  • Don’t bother creating a team: Radical but true. A true team will sink or swim together. Unless you can affect each individual’s salary, bonus and workload (which is an extreme request in 99.9% of projects as they are cross-functional in nature), don’t expect your group to work as a team with the expectation that everyone has the same goal from their day-to-day manager. Instead, find a way to use these diverse backgrounds to your advantage. Bring the group together on specific tasks, engage individuals in a way that works for their particular situation and day-to-day manager.
  • Communicate the why: No matter what else happens, the number one priority should be to communicate the why behind the project. One way to bring this group of individuals together for a common purpose is to make sure the purpose is crystal clear – and the why behind the project is understood and energizing.
  • Follow up selectively: Since we know that cross-functional project teams run into many conflicting objectives and challenges, it is important not to waste precious energy on non-essential tasks. Focus selectively on what will move the project forward and ensure success – in essence, ignore everything but the critical path.
  • Celebrate successes: Don’t wait for the project to be completed successfully. Instead, look for wins along the way. If success or failure boils down to people, it is wise to think about what will keep people motivated. Ignoring them while they overcome daily obstacles might be commonplace but it won’t equate to success. Catch people doing right.
  • Get rid of poor performers: One of the most important things a leader can do is to address poor performers. It gives your top performers hope that you understand what’s required for success and that you appreciate top talent.

Without people, there are no projects. Since projects can drive substantial results, it is worth figuring out how to stack the odds in your favor. And, the great news is that there is no deep, technical understanding required to lead a project effectively. Instead, your ability to ask good questions and lead people are the keys to success as a project leader. Give us the best leaders with mediocre technical skills any day vs. mediocre leaders with excellent technical skills. Undoubtedly, the project will deliver dramatic improvements to your business instead of continually struggling.

       

Did you like this article? Continue reading on how to become a Systems Pragmatist:

 

Employee Performance: Do Not Ignore Your Stars

 

People, People & People

IveBeenThinkingBlog-1024x459.jpgLast week, I went on a fascinating tour of the L.A. Times operations. It was quite impressive — and massive. Did you know the L.A. Times has the largest operation in the U.S.? They print for the Wall Street Journal, USA Today and others in addition to the L.A. Times.   

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The equipment and automation was simply amazing. Obviously the L.A. Times knows how to run operations — and specializes. That's why they distribute much more than the L.A. Times. Do you know your area of expertise? How do you leverage it?

 

One tip to implement this week:

 

I don't subscribe to the "specialize or die" mantra that some marketing folks pronounce as best. After all, one of the ways you can be an expert in your specialty is to be a generalist in several areas surrounding your area of expertise. However, knowing your area of expertise is similar to knowing your strengths. I guarantee you'll be more successful focusing on strengths and your area of expertise than worrying about your areas of weakness!

 

For your career, take a step back this week and think about your best area of expertise. What is it? How can you utilize it more? Ask your colleagues for feedback. Think about how you can help others with your area of expertise.

 

For your company, think about your company's best area of expertise. What differentiates you from your competition? What do you do better than anyone? Start by brainstorming all of the areas of strength. Don't evaluate them. Just identify them for now. Once you have a list, get your team together. Rank them. Which can you build upon? There will always be a multitude of ways to further utilize these unique factors. 

 

Looking for more ideas to keep your supply chain connected? Access more tips and resources on my blog. And keep connected by subscribing to my newsletter and email feed of “I’ve Been Thinking…”

Fotolia_69373637_XS.jpgWhy do so many companies run into issues with inventory accuracy?  After working on hundreds of projects with companies spanning many industries such as aerospace, building products and food, I’ve found these pitfalls are the most common:

  • Transaction timing issues – although they might perform system transactions, they are not completed on a timely basis. Thus, the system gets all mixed up – with the best case scenario.
  • Transaction quantity issues – who hasn’t had fat fingers and keyed in 10000 instead of 1000? I’d be hard pressed to think of a client who hasn’t experienced that issue. In addition, there are transpositions of numbers, incorrect counts, etc.
  • Transaction sequence – even if everything is perfect with the quantity and timing, there are countless problems with transactions being completed in the incorrect sequence. Unfortunately, systems are rarely forgiving with this issue. Typically, they would need to be backed out and start over.
  • Transaction training – often, there isn’t a full understanding of how to perform the transactions. How to undo problem transactions is especially important but rarely understood.
  • Count and adjust mentality – there are many companies that “count and adjust” to keep their inventory accurate. They miss the critical step of reconciliation and root cause analysis. Actually counting and adjusting can lead to even larger inventory issues because root causes are never getting addressed and the inventory gets worse and worse over time.
  • Other inventory adjustments – other inventory adjustments often get in the way. For example, if we change one part number into a different part number and there isn’t a production entry for the transition, it is often done through an inventory adjustment. That can be fine; however, these inventory adjustments, timing and process needs to be understood and incorporated into the cycle counting process.
  • Virtual warehouses – these can create havoc with inventory accuracy.  They are often used for quality hold, to “save” product for customers etc.  Keeping track of transactions related to these is important and will have a profound impact on the rest of your inventory accuracy.

 

Did you like this article? Continue reading on how to be the Strongest Link in your organization:

 

Why Care about Systems Transactions?

 

Solid Inventory Management Practices Remain Timeless

IveBeenThinkingBlog-1024x459.jpgWhen I've needed customer service the most, Staples has been there! A while back, my house burned down. When that happened, the manager of the local Staples went WAY out of her way to help dig up old invoices to assist with the arduous accounting process. However, the reason I'm thinking about Staples now is because they came to my rescue again.

 

Last weekend, I attended the APICS district meeting in Newport Beach. After Friday's Presidents meeting, I went to dinner with two colleagues. I left my laptop sitting on the desk in the hotel, knowing I had to write a proposal upon my return. When I got back to the room, my laptop was DEAD. I tried all sorts of things to make it work, looked up solutions on my phone, etc. It was hopeless. Thus, instead of writing a proposal, I was searching on my phone for a new laptop and sending emails to IT support resources to try to get help. Of course, my laptop would crash on Friday night with no provocation. 

 

I have to say, several of my IT trusted advisors responded Saturday morning (nice to work with the best!); however, I couldn't do much more until Monday. I planned to miss a session on Saturday to find a Best Buy. I looked out the window in the morning and saw Staples.  

 

The tech guy at Staples (who was also an Assistant Manager but he came to help because the regular tech guy was tied up) was EXTREMELY helpful and tried all sorts of things to get my laptop working. He went over and beyond and made me feel much better. Although he couldn't fix it while there, he set me up with the right hardware and people to save my data and work next steps. And he charged me $0. I left with a broken laptop — and happy.

 

After the meeting, I stopped at the Ontario Staples on the way home to pick up an interim laptop I purchased. Unfortunately, it turned out, it was in Ontario, Oregon; not Ontario, CA, but they were so helpful and made sure the LaVerne store was prepared for my arrival the next day that I felt good about my experience anyway. They even offered me free items for my trouble. Next, the LaVerne tech guy actually found the magic formula (that no one thought existed) and got my laptop working — same day, on a Sunday. More than the laptop help, they shined when it came to customer service. I will be back!

 

One tip to implement this week:

 

None of these folks were technically in customer service yet I will return to Staples because of their customer service. They were exceptional. They made me believe that my laptop troubles and helping me with my problem was their most important item of the day. Do you make your customers feel that way?

 

If you are in customer service, sales or an executive, you are on the front lines with your customers. Believe me, they always have a choice. Customer service will help you stand out from the crowd.

 

If you are in any other support position, you still have customers. For example, if you are in production, you probably have shipping and warehousing as your customers. If you are in production planning, customer service, operations and accounting are your customers. Everyone has customers. Do they want to work with you? This is certainly something where you can make an immediate impact. Think of how you want to be treated. What would stand out for you? Pass on the goodwill.

 

Looking for more ideas to keep your supply chain connected? Access more tips and resources on my blog. And keep connected by subscribing to my newsletter and email feed of “I’ve Been Thinking…”

Fotolia_99618287_XS.jpgWho cares about process disciplines? All executives say they care but few are willing to focus the efforts on instilling process disciplines. It seems like a less important topic than creating a new product, expanding into new markets or increasing margins; however, it is at the crux of success! No improvements can be made in inventory, service, efficiencies and the like without starting here.

 

When we see a client with excellent process disciplines, we typically see the following:

  1. Clear understanding of roles and responsibilities
  2. Clear understanding of the process steps and related system transactions that support the business.
  3. Clear understanding of the timing, sequencing and interaction among process steps and functional departments.

We've seen some clients with books of process documentation yet very little success with process disciplines. Of course, having a documented process is a good idea; however, that alone will get you nowhere. Instead, think about and communicate the importance of process disciplines. Support the documentation of "what makes sense". And results will follow.

 

After 11 years of consulting and 15 years before that in organizational life, I can communicate with absolute certainty that those who emphasize process disciplines will be more successful in growing the business and increasing margins than those who don't. If you'd like to talk over how process disciplines could be strengthened in your business, contact us

 

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Bedrock Topic: Inventory Accuracy

 

The Significant Value of Processes

IveBeenThinkingBlog-1024x459.jpgOur APICS Inland Empire chapter went on a tour of Paulson Manufacturing, and it was simply excellent! It reminded me of how powerful the influence and impact of the CEO is on an organization. Roy Paulson, the President, not only spent considerable time with us talking about the market, his strategy, obstacles and technology but he also personally walked us around his facility.

 

I will dedicate a future Profit through People article to some of Roy's wisdom; however, one concept that permeated the day was the power of leadership. Roy talked about working in every job at his facility. He learned from all sorts of different people including the government. He isn't afraid to spend countless hours on what he knows could be important. He is willing to talk about failures as well as successes. And, he has so many ways of giving back to the community — and the nation — that it could take years to wind down some of these responsibilities. Do you think his people follow? Of course!

 

 

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Here's our picture at the end of the tour (by his 3D printer)

 

One tip to implement this week:

 

So, perhaps you cannot join President Obama's export council this week (since this is one of Roy's many roles) but you can make progress in terms of leadership. Part of leadership is listening.

 

If you are in a leadership position, make a conscious effort to listen and walk in a new set of shoes for the day. You might learn something that could have a powerful impact on your business. I'd also like to suggest that you set aside time for thinking about strategy.

 

If you are not in a leadership position, do not despair. I cannot tell you how people I've seen who have had a profound impact with followers throughout the company who were not in a direct leadership role. Start building your skills. Ask questions and listen. I bet you'll pick up on something in short order that you could recommend to leadership or improve on your own, starting immediately. Let me know how it goes.

 

Looking for more ideas to keep your supply chain connected? Access more tips and resources on my blog. And keep connected by subscribing to my newsletter and email feed of “I’ve Been Thinking…”

Fotolia_109344344_XS.jpgStrategy and plans do not fail in formulation; they fail in implementation.  Time and time again, my clients prove this statement.

 

Although I am an expert in helping clients select the best ERP system to meet their objectives (and have developed a proprietary process for just this process – ACE), system implementations go awry during implementation. I also happen to be an expert at significant change initiatives in complex organizations (whether merger and acquisitions or culture change) – undoubtedly, they go off the rails during implementation; not formulation.  Thus, it is quite critical to consider the value of implementation.

 

Because these initiatives are core to success, it is worth thinking about what has the most impact on results. The problem with implementation is that it requires hard work and leadership. There aren’t short cuts on this path to success. For example, when going through a merger, acquisition or selling the business, it is important to think through how you’ll handle issues that arise.  If there is one certainty with these types of projects, it is that issues will arise.  If you haven’t figured out how to address them so that the team aligns with the path forward, damage will be done. Synergies will disappear. Margins will decline. Morale will drop. Customers might hit the road. Thinking through how to handle these scenarios in a way that aligns with “what you said you’ll do” and the company philosophy is important.

 

If nothing else, consider “thinking before you act” when it comes to implementation. It is easy to slide to the 80% fail rate to meet expectations.  You must be on your toes, proactive and fully understanding the value of implementation for success to consider following you.

 

 

Did you like this article? Continue reading on how to strengthen your Eagle Eye:

 

It Begins and Ends with Leadership

 

Uncommon Common Sense Project Management

 

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LMA Consulting Group President Lisa Anderson adds another key achievement to her many accomplishments by providing advice, guidance, strategic tips and assistance to those in supply chain, manufacturing, project management and distribution in over 70 blog post articles in Project Times, an online resource for project managers. Since 2009, Anderson has been a regular contributor to this ultimate PM destination for news, tips, resources and articles and regularly publishes on topics of project planning, project management software, project leadership and project manager skillsets.

 

I’m partial to the plight of the project manager since so much is contingent on the successful oversight of a project’s implementation,” explains LMA Consulting President Lisa Anderson. “Solid project leadership delivers dramatic – and critical – results for manufacturers and distributors in today’s Amazon-impacted business environment. Thus, equipping your resources with knowledge of the best tools and strategies to ensure success delivers key customer initiatives, improves service, increases profit and accelerates cash flow. Project Times is an excellent resource that project managers can use 24/7, and I’ve been pleased to provide content for the past seven years.

 

Celebrating its eleventh year, LMA Consulting Group helps growing companies make and keep bold customer promises while elevating overall business performance and profits. Anderson, who was named to the top 100 best global supply chain management blogs bySupplyChainOpz, and also recognized as the 16th most influential in supply chain management and sustainability by technology leader SAP in theTop 46 Resource and Optimizations Influencers (Plus a Few Others),” started LMA Consulting Group as a regular content contributor in topics including supply chain, ERP and SIOP. Anderson has been interviewed for articles in publications like Industry Week, tED Magazineand the Wall Street Journal. She actively posts educational blogs three times weekly and has two newsletters, Profit through PeopleSM and “I’ve Been Thinking.” For information about Lisa Anderson, go to http://www.lma-consultinggroup.com/ or call 909.630.3943.

Fotolia_115499874_XS.jpgAs my HR mentor used to say, it begins and ends with leadership. Although we’ve certainly talked about this topic before, it is worth it to dedicate time to it again. After all, results follow leaders.

 

The leader sets the tone and direction. As consultants, we find that we can make good progress, no matter the leader; however, there is ZERO doubt the progress will be much quicker with a solid leader supporting our initiative.  This has occurred 100% of the time! For example, we are currently working with a client that would like to improve service levels to its customers. We were making progress regardless; however, we moved into high gear with leadership focus. Think of it as pushing a boulder up hill. Assuming you have some athletic ability, you’ll eventually push the boulder up the hill if it is important enough; however, if you have the “right” leaders in place, it feels like you go from pushing a boulder uphill to giving it a small tap downhill. That boulder will ACCELERATE and build momentum – success follows.

 

Instead of thinking you’ll “get to” talking to your key resources “when time is available”, MAKE the time. Don’t focus all of your attention on poor performers. Dedicate at least equal time – if not more time – to high performers and your success will gain steam. Remember the basics such as performance management. Recognize progress and results. Appreciate your top performers. Undoubtedly, you’ll be thrilled you did.

 

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The Value of Feedback

 

Motivate Employees as One Critical Way to Retain Top Performers